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How to Organize a Wellness-Themed Bridal Shower

how to organize a wellness bridal shower

If there’s anyone who could use a little extra self-care, it’s undoubtedly a woman planning her wedding. While this is an incredibly exciting time in her life, it’s also one of the most stressful times. Planning your big day, whether or not you’re lucky enough to have the help of a wedding planner, involves a great deal of time, money and dedication, all of which can suck the energy out of you. This is just one reason why wellness-themed bridal showers are becoming increasingly popular. Another is because of the accessibility of massages and therapeutic treatments.

To help inspire you to plan the relaxing, self-care-centered bridal shower of your dreams, we talked to top wedding planners for their best tips on where to start.

Massage therapy

With Zeel, you can have several massage therapists arrive at your venue for hours of chair massage sessions for all your guests. Chair massage is a fully-clothed back and neck massage that lasts between 10-20 minutes — long enough to relax, short enough to not miss on any bridal fun. Don’t worry about equipment or logistics, all you have to do is request the number of massage therapists you need and put the location and time. The rest will be taken care of.

Get more info about Zeel chair massage

Once you’ve taken care of the guests’ massage, don’t forget to set aside downtime for the most important person, the bride! Get the full treatment by booking a full-body massage before or after the bridal shower. You can pick between a 60, 75 or 90-minute massage but our advice is to go all out — you’d be surprised how rejuvenating 90 minutes can be! Similarly to the chair massage, the therapist will come to your doorsteps and bring all the necessary equipment.

Read more: The Benefits of a Full Body Massage

Select your venue

Hosting your bridal shower at your home, or a friend or family member’s, has is a feasible option—especially if you’re planning a wellness-themed bridal shower. Who needs all the extra noise and chaos that comes along with hosting at a public destination?

Instead, invite all of your closest friends and relatives to a quiet spot and book massage therapists to arrive at your desired time. As Kimberly Lehman of Love, Laughter & Elegance in Massillon, Ohio, attests, “this is a great idea for budget-savvy brides who are looking to save as much as possible in preparation for the lifetime of marriage ahead of them.”

Decide on food and drink

No matter your bridal shower theme, food and drink options are always the heroes of the day. For a wellness-oriented shindig, Lindsey Sachs, a wedding planner and owner of COLLECTIVE/by Sachs in Boulder, Colorado, and Minneapolis, suggests planning a health-focused menu with good eats that not only look great but taste delicious.

“We’re not talking boring celery sticks or foods lacking flavor, but rather nutrient-rich options such as turkey meatball gyros with fresh dill and cucumber, greek yogurt tzatziki sauce, a make-your-own toast bar with avocado, sprouts and seeds or a chilled gazpacho soup with grilled shrimp,” she says. “Turn to your local health food market or local caterer to discuss catered options and, if possible, make all recipes available for guests to take home.”

Create activity stations

Of course, the main activity will be pampering but, since it’s a bridal shower, your guests will expect the mandatory bridal games. “This helps guests interact more intimately with one another in smaller groups,” says Sachs, and you can do it without straying away from the wellness focus.

In addition to massage stations, she recommends a salad jar creation station. “With most showers hosted on weekends, this is the perfect time to meal prep!” she says. “Guests can build their own salads in a convenient take-home mason jar and feel ready to take on the week with a healthy salad in tow.”

Another great idea in a gratefulness activity station. “This activity station gives guests time to pen a sweet message to their honey (or someone else in their life who inspires them) and let them know how much they’re grateful for their presence in their life,” she adds. “Supply guests with a variety of cute cards, pens, and postage stamps and watch the smiles grow as they think about their loved one receiving the letter.”

Pick your music

While creating a playlist for your wellness-themed bridal shower, might not be top-of-mind, Sachs urgest brides not to forget it. “It’s important that you choose the right music to accentuate the celebratory vibe of your wellness-themed bridal shower,” she says. “This doesn’t’ need to be slow, soothing spa music that’s going to put everyone to sleep, but it can be feel-good tunes that make you feel alive!”

Match your party favors to the theme

There are countless party favor options for a wellness-themed wedding shower. One great choice is aromatherapy, which is becoming more and more popular.

“Aromatherapy favors are perfect for a bridal shower, especially when you can combine different oils to make your own personal blends, for relaxation, for sleep aid, etc.,” says Lehman.

Another option is a goodie bag of wellness treats, like homemade muesli, granola or protein balls. “Everyone loves surprise gifts, so this gesture will go a long way and remind guests to keep their own self-care in check,” adds Sachs.

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Everything You Need to Know About the Groom’s Cake

This wedding tradition is still alive and well.

Contributing Writer
buffalo check axe log cake

Photography by: Sugar Geek Show

If you’re like most people, you might only be familiar with one wedding cake—that is, the one the bride and groom cut into on their wedding night and feed to each other as a significance of their shared love. But wedding traditions from other cultures incorporate more than just one cake. The groom’s cake, which originated in Victorian England, is one such example. “As tradition has it, there were typically three cakes served during a Victorian wedding,” says Kimberly Lehman, wedding and event planner at Love, Laughter & Elegance. “There was the wedding cake that was served to the guests, the bride’s cake, which was served to the bridesmaids, and the groom’s cake, served to the groomsmen.” Eventually, Southern brides and grooms in the United States adopted this tradition, making it their own. (Who could forget the armadillo-shaped groom’s cake in Steel Magnolias?)

 

While the tradition has changed over time, the groom’s cake is still alive and well. In fact, it may be becoming more popular than ever. Couples across the United States and abroad—even Prince William had one at his wedding to Kate Middleton!—are serving a second confection tailored to the groom’s specific tastes. Thinking adding another cake to your party in honor of new husband? Here are some interesting facts to know about the groom’s cake.

 

RELATED: UNIQUE IDEAS FOR THE GROOM’S CAKE

 

The earliest groom’s cakes were actually fruitcakes.

Fruitcakes are a dark, rich cake filled with candied fruits and nuts that tend to keep well, especially with all of the liqueur used in their creation, explains Lehman. This is also why they are so popular to give as gifts during the holiday season! “Today, groom’s cakes are usually made with dark chocolate and may be filled with fruits and liqueurs, however, the groom’s favorite cake flavors and fillings should definitely take priority in this luscious dessert,” she says.

 

The groom’s cake is not always served at the wedding reception.

These days, especially for the less traditional couples, the groom’s cake is served at the rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding. “This is always a nice touch because it spreads the fun across your wedding weekend,” says Catherine George, owner of Catherine George Cakes in Washington, D.C. She suggests leaving the cake out on display for a while before it’s served.

 

Although designated for the groom, couples are designing the groom’s cake together.

Though the cake design you select for your wedding reception will likely be fairly traditional in terms of color and decoration, the groom’s cake can be a bit more lighthearted and fun. Choose the look together as a fun detail you can both have some say in. If you like a classic look, though, feel free to go for it. The groom’s cake doesn’t have to show off his hobbies or interests. “As couples are veering away from a traditional cake (in the last few months we have seen a cookie truck, donuts, cobbler or pie, and ice cream for dessert instead) the need for a groom cake as an expression of the groom’s personality is becoming unnecessary,” says Isadora Martin-Dye, a wedding planner and owner of owner of Rixey Manor.

 

In terms of flavor and design, there really are no limits.

“Although the Southern tradition is to make a red velvet cake, I don’t believe wedding cakes in general need to have limits on flavors,” says Liz Berman, Boston-based baker and owner of The Sleepy Baker in Natick, Massachusetts. The same goes for its overall look. “I had a groom joke around about how he wanted a wedding cake that was a pegasus with him riding on the back. The bride refused to allow that and ordered a traditional tiered cake, but then secretly hired me to make a groom’s cake. The wedding cake was displayed next to a sculpted pegasus cake with an image of the groom riding on the back!”

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What to Do If You (or One of Your Wedding VIPs) Are Sick the Week of the Wedding

Don’t let illness ruin the fun.

Contributing Writer
sick-on-wedding-day-1115.jpg

Photography by: Westend61

Ever become overwhelmed with worry when you think about all of the big and little things about your wedding day that you need to go right? It’s totally normal to freak out—you’re planning a huge event and a day that will hold immense meaning for you, your fiancé and your families. Of course, like anything in life, nothing is perfect and your wedding won’t be either. But that’s okay! Even illness is inevitable, especially during cold and flu season, so it’s smart to be prepared for anything and have more than one person that you can go to for support.

 

What happens if you, the bride or groom, or one of your wedding VIPS becomes ill during the week of your nuptials? It’s a tough dilemma that can totally happen. Of course, if your symptoms are treatable you can get on medications, but what happens if you get sick the day of the wedding? Kimberly Lehman, wedding and event planner at Love, Laughter & Elegance tries to be prepared for any situation—even the bride and groom turning green on their big day. “I have an emergency kit that contains over-the-counter medications like aspirin and ibuprofen, antacid tablets, various topical creams, a small first aid kit and personal products,” she says. “Being trained in general first aid, CPR and how to use an AED is a good idea for all event professionals.”

 

If you’re worried about getting sick—or someone important getting sick—before or at your wedding, here are some doable lines of defense.

 

RELATED: HEALTHY TRICKS TO GET YOU WEDDING READY

 

Hire a wedding planner at the beginning of your planning journey.

“A planner will be able to step in and take care of any last-minute crisis, whether it’s a few weeks before or on the ‘day of’ to ensure you have a special and memorable day you feeling like your day was ruined,” says Deborah L. Erb, owner and event planner at Simply Events Inc. “Planners also carry emergency kits with them in case someone needs pain reliever, something for an upset stomach or first aid kit.” They can also run out to get you anything else you need from a local pharmacy to help you and your loved ones get through the day!

 

Take care of yourself in the best way possible.

Planning a wedding is a stressful time—not only for the bride and groom, but also for those participating in the planning process, such as your parents, siblings, and wedding party. A month or so before the wedding, email or call as many of those important people as you can and remind them to take preventative steps to stay healthy in the weeks leading up to your wedding. “Eat well, stay hydrated, get your rest (eight hours each night!) and allow yourself some time to relax,” says Erb.

 

Recognize symptoms.

“Heading into wedding week, your body and mind will feel so many emotions—excitement, anxiety, stress, and nervousness,” says Lindsey Sachs, a wedding planner and owner of COLLECTIVE/by Sachs in Boulder, Colorado, and Minneapolis. “Take a moment early in the week to do a self-health check to monitor possible symptoms that could grow into sickness.” Remember: The sooner you can recognize these symptoms, the sooner you can begin to treat them.

 

Get checked out by your doctor.

Even if you’re feeling slightly under the weather, it’s important to listen to what your body is trying to tell you and seek out medical assistance. “Explain that you have a big day coming up and you need to be able to get through it and hopefully feeling well,” says Erb.

 

RELATED: 3 TIPS THAT WILL HELP YOU BE HEALTHIER IN THE MONTHS LEADING UP TO YOUR WEDDING

 

Keep your family and friends informed on your progress.

If you are not feeling well—or a wedding VIP is not feeling well—let the other important members of the wedding party know. “Everyone will pitch in to assist as much as possible, to make sure the wedding day goes smoothly or to rearrange and reschedule plans as needed,” says Lehman. “Delegate duties and errands to your wedding party and family members.” If you’ve hired a wedding planner or coordinator, they can also assist in contacting vendors, wedding party members and guests and updating important information regarding the wedding. “We are here to help you,” Lehman adds.

 

Stay positive.

Sachs urges not to let your mind focus on the negative outcomes of being sick the week of the wedding. “The sickness of a wedding VIP can create unnecessary focus and attention away from the wedding as a result,” she says. “The marriage is what you want to remember and not who was sick.” Use the power of positive thinking to your benefit and breathe, think optimistically and hope for the best!

 

Have a “plan B” in place.

If a parent is sick, think of other people in advance that could step in for them last-minute if necessary, suggests Erb. Otherwise, come up with options to make it easier for them to “carry out their duties,” and rest in between or always have a chair to sit on. “Seek out someone that you trust to care for the one who is ill, so everyone can get through the day,” Erb says.

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5 Steps to Postponing a Wedding Because of Bad Weather

Written by Jenn Sinrich  Photo: Sam Stroud Photography

Any wedding planner or person who’s walked down the aisle can attest to the fact that there’s no such thing as a wedding going perfectly as planned. There will be bumps in the road to planning and executing your big day. And, while many of the obstacles that may arise can be overcome, others may be completely out of your control, for example postponing a wedding due to weather.

Most winter brides, especially those located in northern regions, are aware that their designated wedding date comes with the chance of snow, but those getting married during the three other seasons usually don’t have the slightest concern over anything more than rain preventing their wedding bells from ringing.

As we’ve come to realize, however, especially in recent years, natural disasters are happening more and more frequently. For this reason, it’s important for brides and grooms, as well as their families and friends, to be prepared for the unimaginable—and uncontrollable.

“It’s important to have a backup plan year round,” says Emily Sullivan of Emily Sullivan Events in New Orleans, Louisiana. “You could be contending with any kind of weather on your big day—it really varies depending on the region and situation, so it’s wise to have these conversations about the possibility of postponing a wedding with your wedding planner or coordinator prior to your wedding date.”

While having a plan B, C and even D early on is helpful, not all brides and grooms will—or can—be completely prepared. So if you get to the point in your wedding where postponing your wedding is imminent, here are expert strategies for how to handle the situation.

Step One: Ask for help

Even the most precise, organized and by-the-book wedding has its share of missing components. This means you likely won’t be able to handle all the tiny to-dos yourself. And this is especially true when dealing with something as catastrophic as a natural disaster. “If you are also personally affected with the crisis of a weather-related scenario (like we had here in Texas recently where bride’s home and her wedding venues were under water), you’ll need to enlist supportive help,” explains Cheryl Bailey of Yellow Umbrella Events in Austin, Texas. “Ideally, get the help of someone who’s not in the same situation as you, like your wedding planner or a friend or family member outside of the affected area, who can help you make decisions and start emailing and making calls.”

Step Two: Contact your venue immediately

“The sooner a couple gets in touch with their venue, the more options they will have surrounding the cancellation and hopefully not lose out on their deposits,” says Wendy Collins of Stowe Mountain Lodge in Stowe, Vermont. Remember that your venue is at the very center of your big day, as it will virtually house all of the rest of your vendors, like your DJ or band, florist, officiant, etc. Bailey suggests working out a plan with your venue in regards to how you should move forward when it comes to postponing your wedding. For example, moving your wedding to the night before or the next day. If this option isn’t available to you, Bailey recommends choosing an entirely new wedding date and time. “It’s important to try and secure this new date immediately, as other weddings will likely be in the same situation as you and the next available dates may fill up quickly.”

Step Three: Contact the rest of your vendors

Once you’ve established a plan of attack, and have a new wedding date secured, email all of your vendors and make them aware of the situation. “It’s easiest to email the entire group of vendors at once with a blanket statement about what is happening and then all vendors can be in the loop,” says Bailey. “Most vendors are very understanding when it comes to a weather-related situation that’s out of your control and will be very accommodating if you need to reschedule, as long as they have your new date available.” Do remember, however, that some of them may be booked on your new date, so you may lose your security deposit. “If you should need to book new vendors, such as a DJ or a photographer, your wedding planner can help you find the right ones quickly through their extensive network,” adds Kimberly Lehman of Love, Laughter & Elegance in Massillon, Ohio.

Step Four: Reach out to your guests

This one will likely be the most time-consuming, since you’ll likely have to reach out to certain friends or relatives via telephone as opposed to easier methods like email or social media. Bailey suggests starting by including as many guests as you have emails for on one email with information regarding the cancellation of your wedding and including information for a contact person they can reach out to in case they need further assistance.” Don’t hesitate to use your social media network, too. “Social media is your friend when postponing a wedding” she says. “You can always post on Facebook to let guests know what’s happening, or even start a private Facebook group where you add all of your guests, and even vendors, with the details of the cancellation and the reschedule date and details.” And be sure to update your wedding websitewith any updated information.

Step Five: Take a deep breath

By this point, overwhelmed doesn’t come close to describe how you and your partner are feeling. But, Bailey points out that the most important thing is that you and your guests are safe and out of harm’s way. “Stop, breathe deeply and calmly and focus on yourself and your partner and the fact that you are both together and able to handle this situation as a couple,” she says. Hold hands, hug, cry, laugh, pray—whatever you need to do to get by until you finally get to say say “I do!”

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https://www.marthastewartweddings.com/619928/social-media-changing-wedding-planning

6 Ways Social Media Is Changing Wedding Planning

Planners dish on what’s different in the age of Instagram.

Contributing Writer
woman using cell phone

Photography by: Getty Images

There’s no arguing that social media and its many platforms and pretenses has forever changed the world of weddings. In fact, it’s even difficult for some to imagine a time when the only people who caught a glimpse of the bride and groom on their wedding day were the hundred or so attendees themselves—and maybe a lucky handful who spent some time on the newlyweds’ couch flipping through their glossy album. Nowadays, anyone in the world has immediate access to the attire, décor, location, and events that occurred at any given celebration. Even going into work once your wedding weekend or honeymoon has concluded isn’t the same—everyone has specific questions about “that view” or “those stunning flowers—what were they?” To dig deeper into the many ways weddings have changed thanks to social media, we talked to wedding planners who’ve seen it all.

 

CAN SOCIAL MEDIA HURT YOUR MARRIAGE?

 

Brides have exposure to a variety of different weddings.

The image of the modern wedding is no longer limited to what one sees in a magazine or on a television program, Kimberly Lehman, wedding and event planner at Love, Laughter & Elegance points out. Now, the images are everywhere: on mobile phones, tablets, laptop computers. Think about how little you would know about weddings if you had to subscribe to a number of wedding magazines and wait every month to get your hands on the latest copy? Now, with consumer demand, countless wedding websites (like this one!) deliver instant information at your fingertips.

 

Expectations are set so high and can be unrealistic.

“The hard part that we’ve all found is that social media allows for brides and grooms to see other weddings and love what they are seeing without realizing the time and money it actually took to create the look,” explains Brandi Hamerstone, a wedding planner at All Events Planned. “Unfortunately, there are so many unrealistic expectations that people now have for their day that they might not be able to afford, or won’t have the time to create if it’s DIY.” This isn’t to say you shouldn’t browse the web to storm up ideas for your big day, but it’s important to keep in mind your own limitations—which are totally okay to have.

 

Couples connect more with friends and family.

Chances are, not all of your friends and family will be able to make your big day. The good news is that social media allows them to feel like they were a part of the event even if they weren’t physically present. “Unique apps can transmit important information about your wedding to those who weren’t able to be there,” says Candice Dowling Coppola, owner and creative director at A Jubilee Event. “The one downside we’ve noticed, however, is that some couples crave a sense of privacy that social media makes it hard for them to have.” In her experience, she’s had to ask several guests and hired creatives to refrain from posting pictures of a couple’s wedding unless they’ve given consent. “Some couples prefer to have control over how their wedding day is shared with others,” she adds.

 

27 WEDDING PLANNERS YOU NEED TO FOLLOW ON INSTAGRAM

 

The bevvy of information and inspiration is limitless.

If you’re a bride-to-be who hasn’t scoured Pinterest yet, log on! It’s become the go-to resource for gathering ideas for planning a wedding. “Users can create virtual bulletin boards of their favorite flowers, dresses, cakes, poses for pictures, decorations, and more, as well as share pictures with others, and follow boards that have the same vibe as their own,” says Lehman. YouTube is another hot spot with thousands of videos of everything from wedding hair and makeup tutorials to heartwarming wedding films. “You can watch amazing choreographed wedding party dances, adorable flower girls and ring bearers as they attempt to walk down the aisle, and memorable wedding speeches,” says Lehman.

 

Virtual meetings avoid unnecessary travel.

Any bride- or groom-to-be knows that time is precious when you’re planning a wedding—especially when it comes to managing all of the various meetings you’ll have with vendors. This is when live streaming can seriously come in handy. Instead of commuting two hours in rush-hour traffic, or across the state or country if your wedding location isn’t nearby, you can set up a Google Hangout, Skype call, or any other live-streaming service to chat wedding details with as close to an in-person charm as possible.

 

Couples now “brand” their wedding.

Who knew hashtags would allow you to collect all of the photos and videos from your wedding so easily? “When friends and family upload their pictures to a social media site, they will add the special hashtag so everyone has access to all of the posts in one spot,” Lehman explains. Companies and vendors are also catching onto the trend. “If a couple is looking for a photographer in their hometown, they may use a hashtag such as ‘#ChicagoWeddingPhotographer,’ and the search will deliver listings for wedding photographers in that area.” Can’t come up with a clever hashtag idea for your big day? Try one of the many wedding hashtag generators available online! There’s social media doing its thing once again!

 

 

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8 Wedding Planners Weigh In: Can a Guest Wear White to the Wedding?

Is it really that taboo?

Contributing Writer
bridesmaid drinks

Photography by: Clary Pfeiffer Photography

It happens to the best of us—you fall in love with a stunning cream- or ivory-colored dress that would be just perfect to wear to that wedding you have coming up in a few months. But wait—is it too close in hue to the bride’s attire? Does she care? Will other wedding guests care?

 

Some might say “go for it,” while others will be quick to say it’s a bad idea. Like any other situation, there are two sides to every story. “The tradition of the white wedding dress began when Queen Victoria married Prince Albert in 1840,” explains Kimberly Lehman, wedding and event planner at Love, Laughter & Elegance. “Victoria selected a white satin gown lavishly embellished with lace that was handcrafted in England. After the photographs of the wedding were widely published, brides began copying Victoria’s style by wearing white gowns to their own nuptials.” Since that infamous celebration, it’s generally been frowned upon for anyone other than the bride to wear white to a wedding.

 

But is it still a no-no for wedding guests today? We asked eight wedding planners from all different parts of the country to give us their most unbiased and unfiltered advice.

 

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO DECODING WEDDING DRESS CODES

 

Don’t risk it.

“Out of respect to the bride and the legacy of tradition, go with another color,” says Lindsey Sachs, wedding planner and owner of COLLECTIVE/by Sachs. “Whether you know the bride’s stance on this topic or not, you can’t go wrong by playing it safe. Consider hues that coordinate with the current season, or those that complement the wedding color palette. By not wearing white, you won’t end up the topic of conversation among other curious guests and, most importantly, your wardrobe choice won’t detract from the bride who deserves to be honored on her wedding day as the leading lady in white.”

 

It’s no longer taboo to wear white!

“According to the Emily Post Institute, it’s acceptable to wear white, as long as it doesn’t ‘distract from the bride or her attendant’s dresses.’ For example, a colorful, cocktail-length dress with a white lace overlay is acceptable,” says Lehman. “A casual sheath dress also works well, but if the dress is white and floor-length or full-skirted, it won’t work. If a guest or attendant has any hesitation about appropriate attire, it’s usually best to check with the bride, and follow her wishes.”

 

Only when it’s part of the theme.

“There’s only one scenario in which it’s okay to wear white to a wedding and that’s when the couple asks you to. A friend of mine planned a wedding where the bride wore a fuchsia dress and the couple asked all of their guests to wear white. I personally think that’s such a fun idea and a great way to flip tradition on its head,” Leah Weinberg, wedding planner, owner, and executive planner at Color Pop Events, says. “It also made for really striking photos. I’ve also seen couples have their wedding party wear white. Clearly the rule of not wearing white to a wedding doesn’t apply to smaller details like white stripes or polka dots, but my rule of thumb is this: If you’re picking an outfit and the question pops into your mind of whether or not this is too much white to wear to a wedding, then don’t wear it.”

 

Never!

“The bride may or may not wear white (maybe ivory, maybe champagne) but it’s her color for that day. You don’t want to be mistaken for the bride in a white or lace gown,” Brandi Hamerstone, owner and wedding planner at All Events Planned, says. “You don’t want to stand with the bride and look as though you were attempting to look bridal on someone else’s day. Even when or if that wasn’t your intention, that’s what people (and possibly the bride) will think and who wants to be ‘that’ person?”

 

16 WEDDING TRADITIONS AND SUPERSTITIONS

 

I’ve seen it at nearly every wedding.

“After planning hundreds of weddings, I’ve noticed that there are always at least one or two people wearing something along the lines of white at every wedding. Beyond the wedding, it can also be inappropriate to wear a white dress to the rehearsal dinner or bridal shower as you wouldn’t want someone to mistake you for the bride,” says Wendy Collings, catering sales and conference services manager at Stowe Mountain Lodge. “Not that I recommend it, but if you have to wear white, I would follow a few rules to keep the glancing looks from other guests at bay. Don’t wear a floor-length or strapless dress and try to stay away from a high neckline with lace. Do add a bright pop of color like a belt, earrings, chunky statement jewelry, and stay away from updo-style hair.”

 

White’s for the bride only.

“While many wedding traditions are going away, I feel strongly that wearing white or ivory should be reserved for the bride only. That’s not to say that you cannot wear an outfit with some white in it (like a white camisole underneath a jacket with a colorful skirt) or as part of a pattern—just don’t wear a solid white outfit,” Vicky Choy, event planner and owner of Event Accomplished LLC, says. “Even if it’s a summer beach wedding, don’t do it. You can’t tell me that with so many colors out there that the only outfit you can wear to a wedding is a white one.”

 

Tradition stands in this case.

“White is still reserved for the bride(s) or groom(s) only. Of course, there’s almost always an exception to the rule, and in this case I find only one: It is okay to wear white if, and only if, the couple has specifically requested that attire be worn,” Megan Seaton, wedding planner at Molly Mae Events, says. “For example, I had a wedding where all bridesmaids wore a white dress, which was a specific request of the bride. Another example is when couples throw a ‘White Wedding’ or ‘Black and White Party.’ In this case, the attire will be specifically mentioned in the invitation. If it’s not on there, don’t risk it.”

 

There are certainly exceptions.

“If the wedding attire is all white and it has been requested, it’s safe to wear white. We’ll take to Hollywood, where Solange and Tina, Beyonce’s mother and sister, both had an all-white affair for their wedding day,” Myriam Michel, owner and creative director of M&M Elite Events, says. “For my wedding, I had a good girlfriend wear a brocade ivory dress, which, for November, was tastefully done and I didn’t feel upstaged. Use your best judgment as you really don’t want hurt feelings.”

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