We have been mentioned in Martha Stewart Weddings!

We have been blessed, again, to have been mentioned in an article on Martha Stewart Weddings!  Thank you, Jenn Sinrich!!

These Are the Wedding Trends Planners Expect to See in 2018

The pros are very excited about these ideas.

Contributing Writer
156SHARES
Fern Wedding Bouquet with Peonies, Roses, and Zinnias

Photography by: She Takes Pictures He Makes Film

Trends of all kinds can last for just one season or stick around for decades. This is true of wedding trends, too. While the white gowns, loving vows, and festive celebrations will likely remain unchanged, there are plenty of new ideas we can expect to see in future celebrations. To get a look at the wedding trends to come, we asked planners to share the ones they’re gearing up for in 2018.

 

WEDDING TRENDS TO WATCH FOR IN 2018, ACCORDING TO PLANNERS

 

Next-Level Food and Beverages

Wedding food and drinks have been getting more and more unique each year, but Brandi Hamerstone, a wedding planner at All Events Planned, expects to see couples really go for it in 2018. “This trend is happening mostly by a push from the groom!” she adds. “Having a bar with several versions of bourbon (or whisky and tequila), special glassware, and a knowledgeable bartender is a fun concept for everyone. It’s best to have something like this only available through cocktail houror later in the evening as it becomes a focal point and will definitely pull people around and keep them engaged.”

 

Suspended Florals

“In the past few years, floral design has taken a completely different turn. Where we primarily saw arrangements on tables, we’re now seeing flowers suspended from the ceiling,” explains Alison Laesser-Keck, event planner and designer at Alison and Bryan. “This creates an ethereal ambience that’s unexpected and multi-sensory. It just transports people and has a huge impact.” If you love the idea of a hanging floral installation, Laesser-Keck says to make sure you hire an experienced floral designer since there are a lot of logistics and liability to think about. “Find someone who will help you visualize the right location in your venue for maximum impact,” she adds. “Installations can be very expensive, so choose a few key places to do them in and make sure it’s where you’ll be spending the most time.”

 

Fashion Risks

Gone are the days of all-white, strapless wedding dresses, says Laesser-Keck. “Brides today are forgoing tradition and choosing a dress they love. Some go classic for the ceremony then change into something super fun for the party,” she explains. “Either way, we are definitely going in a direction where brides feel like they can showcase their personalities through their outfit choices.” So if you fall in love a patterned dress or one in an unexpected color, wear it.

 

Resurgence of ’80s and ’90s Style

“If the runways at New York Fashion Week were any indication, we’re going to be seeing a major comeback of ’80s and ’90s fashion inspiration in weddings next year,” explains Leah Weinberg, wedding planner, owner, and executive planner at Color Pop Events. “From colors like turquoise and hot pink and patterns like splatter paint and geometrics, those decades will inspire bold ideas that will pop up in a variety of ways—on invites, table runners, day-of signage, and much more.”

 

7 WEDDING TRENDS PLANNERS LOVED IN 2017

 

An Infusion of Metallics

Expect to see some glam events in 2018. According to Larissa Banting, President of Weddings Costa Rica and founder of The Lazy Bride, metallic color palettes will rule the 2018 wedding scene. “We’re seeing a return to luxe, with sparkling sequins overlays, chargers in every shade of metallics, and chairs in varying shades of gold,” she explains. “We’re seeing gold foil on invitations, menus, seating cards, wine glasses—everywhere!”

 

Majestic Marble

Stately, elegant marble will play a big role in upcoming weddings. If your venue already featrues walls or columns in the material, you’re in luck: Use these areas as a ready-made photo booth backgroup. If not, says Kimberly Lehman, wedding and event planner at Love, Laughter & Elegance, find other ways to bring the cool stone into your day. “Use marble patterns in smaller, more decorative ways, like on your invitations or wedding cake,” she suggests. “Marble drink coasters could double as place cards and favors, with names scripted in gold on each one.”

 

Incorporating Your Hobbies and Interests

“Keeping guests entertained and engaged is still popular, and things like open-air photo booths and lawn games are a great way to do that,” says Myriam Michel, owner and creative director of M&M Elite Events. “Couples can make this trend their own by incorporating their hobbies into the reception. For example, this past summer, our couple was big into hookah so we created a custom hookah bar lounge that was a huge hit with all her guests.”

 

Bold Floral Statements

Hanging installations of blooms aren’t the only floral statement couples will make in 2018. Lehman expects to see bouquet upgrades, too. “We’ve seen lush floral bouquets with large blooms and trailing greenery. This will continue into 2018,” she says. “The colors will be bold, and eclectic, rather than the soft pastels so often used. Oversized bouquets and table arrangements will take center stage, with smaller, more subtle accents of candles and ribbons. We will see more patterned floral gowns for brides and attendants, as well as blooms used creatively in hairstyles.”

 

Colored, Custom Tuxedos

Good news for the guys: You also have a trend to look forward to. Michel says that more grooms are making bolder fashion choices and will continue to do so next year. “Men’s fashion is stepping out big. They are making bold tuxedo and suit choices, choosing colors like burgundy, plum, and indigo and wearing slim fit cuts,” she says. “We also see grooms wearing custom bow ties and suspenders.”

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Audrey Hepburn – Funny Face movie inspired bridal photo shoot – The Video!!

On Saturday, November 25th, 2017, my fantastic team of vendors and models descended upon the Courtyard Marriott Hotel in Canton, Ohio, for a styled bridal photo shoot.  I have been planning this event for some time.  One of my favorite movies stars Audrey Hepburn and Fred Astaire – Funny Face.  It’s the only movie they ever made together.  My video partner, Joseph Testa Productions, filmed the whole day, and put together a great video!  We would like to share it with you! Just click the link and enjoy!

Audrey Hepburn – Funny Face Movie Inspired

Vendors:

Planning/Styling:  Kimberly Lehman, Love, Laughter & Elegance: Wedding & Event Planning

Venue:  Courtyard Marriott Hotel – Canton, Ohio

Photographer:  Stephanie Uptmor, Imagine It Photography

Video:  Joseph Testa, Joseph Testa Productions

Floral/Decor:  Linda Boardman, Dietz Falls Florist

Lighting/Backdrop Stand:  Larry Thompson, Thompson Entertainment

Linens/Charger Plates:  L’Nique Linens

Original Artwork:  Michal Elaine Johnston

Stationery Suite:  Angela Marie Giaco, A Pink Sunset

Cakes:  Lana Geiling-Poe, For All O”cake”sions

              Molly Gearhart, Gearhart Custom Cakes 

Jewelry/Brooch Bouquets/Accessories:  Susan Wember Kurtz, Susie Kays Design 

Bridal Fashion:  Madeleine Fig, Madeleine Fig Designs

Bridal Shoes:  Erina, Bella Belle Shoes

Cake Topper:  Lexi Eveleth, Ever Laser

Makeup Artist:  Jessica Laura Hawkins, Exclusively Airbrushed Makeup by Jess

Models:  Lauren Simpson, Brandon Klaehn

Image may contain: 1 person

We have been mentioned on Martha Stewart Weddings!

We have been blessed again, to have been mentioned in an article on Martha Stewart Weddings!  Thank you, Jenn Sinrich!!

 

Is a Destination Wedding Right for You?

A vacation and a wedding all wrapped in one sure sounds great—at least at first.

Contributing Writer
getaway car

Photography by: Abby Jiu Photography

One of the first big decisions you’ll have to make after putting that shiny new ringon your finger is choosing where you want to have your wedding. For many couples, the choice is simple, but for others it can involve a long, drawn-out decision-making process that can months. If you’re not tying the knot in your hometown, your partner’s hometown, or the city you both call home, you’re likely having a destination wedding. Although they’re not for everyone, a destination wedding can provide a sense of excitement (it’s basically a vacation where all of your favorite people are invited) and relief (your second cousins once removed likely won’t make it to Aruba).

 

To help you decide if you’re the type of couple who should tie the knot away from home, wedding planners took us through the questions they ask clients who are considering a far-flung celebraiton.

 

EXPERT TIPS FOR PLANNING A DESTINATION WEDDING

 

Do you want to get married far from?

Kimberly Lehman, wedding and event planner at Love, Laughter & Elegance in Massillon, Ohio, points out that, by definition, a destination wedding is one that takes place at least 100 miles away from where you currently live. That’s about the distance between New York City and Hartford, Connecticut. You don’t have to feel any pressure to have your nuptials in a tourist attraction, though they are popular choices for couples planning destination weddings. “You could get married at a somewhat local bed and breakfast or a charming winery,” adds Lehman. “The most important thing is to consider a destination that appeals to your personalities, dreams, and interests.”

 

Who do you want to be there?

Destination weddings are usually smaller than a hometown wedding would be, as guests have to travel farther for the event. If you’re okay with this, great! If you’re in a situation where you feel obligated to invite several relatives or family friends but don’t really care if they show up, then even better. But it is important to remember that some of your close relatives and friends might not be able to physically travel or afford a plane ticket and hotel stay. Before you book anything, make a list of guests you want by your side, and then see if that core group of people can make it.

 

Can you afford a wedding planner?

Having a wedding planner is extremely helpful in ensuring your destination eventgoes smoothly. “Hiring someone that has the expertise and experience will greatly help when making decisions on quality and trusted vendors,” says Cristen Faherty, wedding and event planner at Cristen & Co Event Coordination & Design in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. “This person could either be a destination planner in your area or a local planner in your destination. Which ever you choose, you have to be willing to give up a little control and trust their recommendations.” Remember, you likely won’t have the luxury of meeting face-to-face with the majority of your vendors, so an on-site planner can represent you from afar.

 

How flexible are you when it comes to dress code?

Enforcing a black-tie dress code—a tux for men and a formal gown for women—is tough when you’re asking loved ones to pack their wedding attire in a suitcase and travel to what might be a totally different climate. That’s not to say it’s not allowed, but you should be comfortable with the fact that some of your guests might not follow suit (literally). If you’re okay with bare feet and flip flops on the dance floor (or sand), then go for it.

 

Are you willing to host more than one event?

When all of your wedding guests are traveling far and wide to be there for your big day, they expect that you’ll be hosting more than the ceremony and reception. Many destinations include welcome parties and daytime activities, like scuba diving or horseback riding, for their guests to enjoy more face time with the bride and groom.

We have an article featured in Nanny Magazine!

We have been blessed with the opportunity to have an article featured in the October Celebrations Issue of Nanny Magazine!!  Our topic was “Organized & Stress-Free Wedding Planning” on page 33.  The layout is gorgeous! Thank you!

Be sure to check out the website:  Nanny Magazine

 

nanny magazine 2

We have been featured in an article on WeddingWire!!

We have been blessed, again, to have been featured in an article on WeddingWire.com!  Thank you, Jenn Sinrich!!

 

The Worst Wedding Advice Ever, According to Real Women

Written by Jenn Sinrich  Photo: Ellys Photography

 

You don’t have to be newly engaged or planning your big day to know that people love giving wedding advice of all kinds. Whether it’s suggestions on color scheme or recommendations on vendors, friends, family and, well, strangers you meet truly enjoy sharing their insight and personal preferences with you to help you with all sorts of decisions you’ll have to make. But before you cling onto their words of wisdom, know this: Their advice might be well-meant, but that doesn’t mean it’s well deserved.

“The uniqueness of a wedding stems from the individuality of the couple, therefore taking advice from just anyone may not work,” explains Tessa Brand of Tessa Lyn Events in Santa Monica, California. “Every couple has a different vision, budget and priority list so outside advice may be harmful rather than helpful.”

Here are some of the worst pieces of wedding advice people have received—and why you should be wary of following this “wedding wisdom.”

“Stick with tradition or you’ll regret it”

“I’m not a very religious or by-the-book person, but so many people warned me to keep my wedding as traditional as possible. They weren’t just talking about the white dress and vows—they were talking about everything, from the ‘something blue’ to the feeding each other wedding cake. I’m all for keeping certain traditions, especially ones I hold dear, alive, but this just felt too stiff and scripted for me.”—Kaleigh R.

The expert says: Do what feels right.

“Many old customs, traditions, and wedding advice are no longer relevant, or interesting to the current generation of brides and grooms,” explains Kimberly Lehman of Love, Laughter & Elegance in Massillon, Ohio. In other words, these days it’s more accepted for couples to make their own, unique decisions when it comes to planning their big day.

“Use all my vendors—it will make planning easier”

“I was the maid of honor for my best friend and I enjoyed her wedding, but when it came time for me to plan my wedding, she was all over me about using her vendors—from her venue to her DJ. It was just she wanted me to do a repeat of her wedding. While I appreciate her suggestions and I do know that she had the best intentions, I wanted to do things my way. Many of the people who attended her wedding would also be attending mine, so I wanted to make sure that they, too, had a different experience and I didn’t want them comparing the two occasions.”—Rebecca O.

The expert says: Do your research to find the right wedding vendors for you.

Your friend may have planned her big day, but that doesn’t mean she did so for two events—both yours and hers. “Recommendations for vendors are great and are a valuable resource for anyone planning an event, but her vendors may not fit your needs for your wedding,” says Lehman.

“You don’t have to meet all vendors in person—it’s a waste of time.”

“When a co-worker told me this, it took so much energy for me to not say something. What the heck do they even mean? I knew from being a bridesmaid for my friends that it’s important that you know who is running your wedding—from the florist to the lighting tech. I was happy that my fiance agreed with me, especially because getting to know our vendors was the fun part!”—Ginny V.

The expert says: In-person meetings are essential.

Be sure to talk to actual wedding professionals, those who have been in their field of expertise for several years, and have references of satisfied customers that you can confirm with, Lehman suggests. So many important topics you’ll want to touch upon with these vendors, including their prefered structure and workflow and the personal touches that will make your day special, are best discussed in person so no details are left out.

“Wedding planners are a waste of money.”

“I foolishly took this wedding advice when planning my own nuptials and it’s something that I regret. Sure, wedding planners might not be for everyone, but I seriously could have used one. My fiance and I are both incredibly busy and live in a tiny apartment in a bustling city. It was so hard to travel to meet our vendors and communicate with our parents who didn’t live in the city parameters. I wish we had someone who was a professional at handling everything overall—someone who would communicate on our behalf to our vendors and our family. It would have taken a serious load off.”—Jen R.

The expert says: Wedding planners can be absolute life-savers.

At the very least, have a consultation with a wedding planner. “They can suggest several choices of vendors that will match your needs and budget and can also give you ideas and wedding advice to get started in your planning, such as color combinations, flowers in each season or a checklist of planning tasks,” says Lehman.

We have been mentioned on Martha Stewart Weddings!

We have been blessed again, to have been mentioned in an article on Martha Stewart Weddings!!  Thank you, Jenn Sinrich!

https://www.marthastewartweddings.com/619474/how-to-choose-rehearsal-dinner-venue

How to Choose the Perfect Rehearsal Dinner Venue

Plus, other planning tips.

Contributing Writer
natalie jamey rehearsal dinner tables

Photography by: KT Merry

The second most important event of your wedding weekend will undoubtedly be your rehearsal dinner. Typically, this is a less-formal event during which close friends and family come together (generally following some form of wedding rehearsal) in celebration of the big event. It’s especially beneficial if many of your guests are coming from out of town, as it’s a nice excuse to spend more time together.

 

“The rehearsal dinner is one of the most anticipated and cherished traditions of a wedding celebration,” says Kimberly Lehman, wedding and event planner at Love, Laughter & Elegance. “For many couples, this will be the first opportunity that their friends and family members will have to meet each other.” To make the most of this treasured evening, we asked twp wedding planners to explain how you should go about selecting the right venue for this important pre-wedding event.

 

THE ULTIMATE WEDDING REHEARSAL AND REHEARSAL DINNER CHECKLIST

 

Step 1: Determine your budget.

First and foremost, figure out how much money you have to spend on the rehearsal dinner. This will help you figure out what kind of event you’re able to have, and how many guests you can invite. Setting your budget also means figuring out who will be shouldering the cost. “Traditionally, the groom’s parentsare the hosts of the rehearsal dinner,” says Lehman. “Today, however, as more couples are paying for the expenses of the wedding themselves, the cost of the rehearsal dinner is often included in the overall budget.” Be sure to allow enough time to scout out the perfect venue, taking into consideration the overall cost of enough food and drinks for guests.

 

Step 2: Settle on a theme.

This is the fun part! Just as you likely chose a theme for your wedding, be it nautical, vintage-traditional, or rustic, you can have fun with the vision you choose for your rehearsal dinner. The food you choose can play a role in this effect as well. Are you big on Italian food? A lover of guac and chips? Don’t feel the need to go fancy just because your wedding day is upscale. “A rehearsal dinner can also be as casual as a pizza party or barbecue in the backyard of the couple’s home, or a local park,” says Lehman. “Generally, whoever hosts the dinner has creative control, taking into account their budget, and the tastes of the couple, aesthetically and gastronomically.”

 

Step 3: Find the right venue.

The rehearsal dinner is often held at a local restaurant or country club, but Lehman points out that any location will do. “A rooftop with a great view in the city, a nostalgic bowling alley, a private home, or a clambake or a bonfire on the beach are all great ideas,” she says. Though she does warn that it’s wise to choose a venue that’s close enough to the wedding ceremony that it provides guests the convenience of not having to travel too far. “Visit several venues to see if there are enough areas for seating and standing, clean restroom facilities, and friendly, well-trained wait staff,” she adds. Will the venue allow the wedding party to bring in decorations, entertainment, and catering as needed?  Will the venue be able to accommodate special dietary needs of guests? Will there be a dress code? These are all things she suggests considering when finding the right venue.

 

LITTLE WHITE LOOKS FOR EVERY WEDDING EVENT

 

Step 4: Finalize your invite list.

Just as your guest list for the big day is important (and likely involved some cutting), you can expect the same when it comes to your rehearsal dinner. “If you’re having a traditional rehearsal dinner, your guests are your VIPs: your immediate family, bridal party, and their dates,” says Tessa Brand, wedding and event planner and owner of Tessa Lyn Events. “A party this size should be able to fit in a private room in a restaurant.” However, if you are extending the invite to all guests, she says this is more of a “welcome party,” which means you will need a larger space. Knowing your approximate guest count will help you determine the price per guest. “Keep in mind, that even if you invite all your wedding guests, the acceptance for a welcome dinner will be lower than your wedding, as people arrive from out of town at different times.”

 

Step 5: Pick your ideal menu.

“The menu is probably the single most influential factor when debating where to have a rehearsal dinner,” says Lehman. “Many couples choose to host their rehearsal dinner in the location they met or where they had their first date.” This is cute and all, but remember that your rehearsal dinner can hold as much or as little meaning as you want. After all, you have a whole wedding dedicated to your love for each other the following day. Have fun and be adventurous! “Sharing the experience with those closest to the couple is what it’s all about,” Lehman adds.

 

Step 6: Plan your décor.

Once you’ve locked down your rehearsal dinner venue and selected from the menu options, your next to-do is décor. Brand suggests going with a completely different color scheme for your flowers, and switching up the décor from what you’ll have at your wedding. “While the idea of having one cohesive wedding weekend may sound ideal, it is much more fun to switch it up and will show you put thought into each event,” she says. “Plus, this leaves an element of surprise for your guests to see on your wedding day.” Floral additions are great, too, as they will easily last a few days and can be repurposed for a farewell brunch at the end of the weekend.

 

We have been featured on Martha Stewart Weddings!

We have been blessed, again, to have been featured in an article on Martha Stewart Weddings!  Thank you, Jenn Sinrich!

http://www.marthastewartweddings.com/619250/can-you-wear-white-to-wedding

 

8 Wedding Planners Weigh In: Can a Guest Wear White to the Wedding?

Is it really that taboo?

Contributing Writer
bridesmaid drinks

Photography by: Clary Pfeiffer Photography

It happens to the best of us—you fall in love with a stunning cream- or ivory-colored dress that would be just perfect to wear to that wedding you have coming up in a few months. But wait—is it too close in hue to the bride’s attire? Does she care? Will other wedding guests care?

 

Some might say “go for it,” while others will be quick to say it’s a bad idea. Like any other situation, there are two sides to every story. “The tradition of the white wedding dress began when Queen Victoria married Prince Albert in 1840,” explains Kimberly Lehman, wedding and event planner at Love, Laughter & Elegance. “Victoria selected a white satin gown lavishly embellished with lace that was handcrafted in England. After the photographs of the wedding were widely published, brides began copying Victoria’s style by wearing white gowns to their own nuptials.” Since that infamous celebration, it’s generally been frowned upon for anyone other than the bride to wear white to a wedding.

 

But is it still a no-no for wedding guests today? We asked eight wedding planners from all different parts of the country to give us their most unbiased and unfiltered advice.

 

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO DECODING WEDDING DRESS CODES

 

Don’t risk it.

“Out of respect to the bride and the legacy of tradition, go with another color,” says Lindsey Sachs, wedding planner and owner of COLLECTIVE/by Sachs. “Whether you know the bride’s stance on this topic or not, you can’t go wrong by playing it safe. Consider hues that coordinate with the current season, or those that complement the wedding color palette. By not wearing white, you won’t end up the topic of conversation among other curious guests and, most importantly, your wardrobe choice won’t detract from the bride who deserves to be honored on her wedding day as the leading lady in white.”

 

It’s no longer taboo to wear white!

“According to the Emily Post Institute, it’s acceptable to wear white, as long as it doesn’t ‘distract from the bride or her attendant’s dresses.’ For example, a colorful, cocktail-length dress with a white lace overlay is acceptable,” says Lehman. “A casual sheath dress also works well, but if the dress is white and floor-length or full-skirted, it won’t work. If a guest or attendant has any hesitation about appropriate attire, it’s usually best to check with the bride, and follow her wishes.”

 

Only when it’s part of the theme.

“There’s only one scenario in which it’s okay to wear white to a wedding and that’s when the couple asks you to. A friend of mine planned a wedding where the bride wore a fuchsia dress and the couple asked all of their guests to wear white. I personally think that’s such a fun idea and a great way to flip tradition on its head,” Leah Weinberg, wedding planner, owner, and executive planner at Color Pop Events, says. “It also made for really striking photos. I’ve also seen couples have their wedding party wear white. Clearly the rule of not wearing white to a wedding doesn’t apply to smaller details like white stripes or polka dots, but my rule of thumb is this: If you’re picking an outfit and the question pops into your mind of whether or not this is too much white to wear to a wedding, then don’t wear it.”

 

Never!

“The bride may or may not wear white (maybe ivory, maybe champagne) but it’s her color for that day. You don’t want to be mistaken for the bride in a white or lace gown,” Brandi Hamerstone, owner and wedding planner at All Events Planned, says. “You don’t want to stand with the bride and look as though you were attempting to look bridal on someone else’s day. Even when or if that wasn’t your intention, that’s what people (and possibly the bride) will think and who wants to be ‘that’ person?”

 

16 WEDDING TRADITIONS AND SUPERSTITIONS

 

I’ve seen it at nearly every wedding.

“After planning hundreds of weddings, I’ve noticed that there are always at least one or two people wearing something along the lines of white at every wedding. Beyond the wedding, it can also be inappropriate to wear a white dress to the rehearsal dinner or bridal shower as you wouldn’t want someone to mistake you for the bride,” says Wendy Collings, catering sales and conference services manager at Stowe Mountain Lodge. “Not that I recommend it, but if you have to wear white, I would follow a few rules to keep the glancing looks from other guests at bay. Don’t wear a floor-length or strapless dress and try to stay away from a high neckline with lace. Do add a bright pop of color like a belt, earrings, chunky statement jewelry, and stay away from updo-style hair.”

 

White’s for the bride only.

“While many wedding traditions are going away, I feel strongly that wearing white or ivory should be reserved for the bride only. That’s not to say that you cannot wear an outfit with some white in it (like a white camisole underneath a jacket with a colorful skirt) or as part of a pattern—just don’t wear a solid white outfit,” Vicky Choy, event planner and owner of Event Accomplished LLC, says. “Even if it’s a summer beach wedding, don’t do it. You can’t tell me that with so many colors out there that the only outfit you can wear to a wedding is a white one.”

 

Tradition stands in this case.

“White is still reserved for the bride(s) or groom(s) only. Of course, there’s almost always an exception to the rule, and in this case I find only one: It is okay to wear white if, and only if, the couple has specifically requested that attire be worn,” Megan Seaton, wedding planner at Molly Mae Events, says. “For example, I had a wedding where all bridesmaids wore a white dress, which was a specific request of the bride. Another example is when couples throw a ‘White Wedding’ or ‘Black and White Party.’ In this case, the attire will be specifically mentioned in the invitation. If it’s not on there, don’t risk it.”

 

There are certainly exceptions.

“If the wedding attire is all white and it has been requested, it’s safe to wear white. We’ll take to Hollywood, where Solange and Tina, Beyonce’s mother and sister, both had an all-white affair for their wedding day,” Myriam Michel, owner and creative director of M&M Elite Events, says. “For my wedding, I had a good girlfriend wear a brocade ivory dress, which, for November, was tastefully done and I didn’t feel upstaged. Use your best judgment as you really don’t want hurt feelings.”

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