We have been featured on The Budget Savvy Bride!!

We have been blessed to have our Starry Starry Night styled bridal photo shoot featured on The Budget Savvy Bride blog!!

https://thebudgetsavvybride.com/starry-night-inspired-styled-shoot/

STARRY NIGHT INSPIRED STYLED SHOOT

This styled bridal shoot was inspired by “The Starry Night” painting by Vincent van Gogh. The shoot is set in a historical home in Massillon, Ohio, and features a gorgeous custom made bridal gown, and beautifully themed decor details. Enjoy this Starry Night Inspired Styled Shoot!

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STARRY NIGHT INSPIRED STYLED SHOOT

Submitted by  Love, Laughter & Elegance: Wedding & Event Planning

What was your design inspiration?

I have long wanted to do a starry night theme. Van Gogh’s Starry Night painting plays well along with this. The mood was to be ethereal, light, sparkling and romantic. A little bit of heaven on earth, if you will.

Describe your flowers.

I wanted to use a mostly white floral scheme, with a hint of blue and silver. My florist created lush, gorgeous bouquets and a centerpiece featuring white anemone, white hydrangea, scabiosa, waxflower, white veronica, dusty miller, and peonies. The flowers were a bright contrast against the navy and silver table linens and formal dresses. The flowers were also to be reminiscent of groups of stars.

Describe your cake.

The cake that Gearhart Custom Cakes created is absolutely gorgeous! It is a four-tier cake, with the bottom layer hand painted in silver.  The top 3 tiers are covered in sparkling navy blue edible glitter. Each tier is defined by a band of bling. The topper is a custom acrylic piece made especially for this project, to finish the cake beautifully.

Tell us about your attire choices.

The attire for this styled shoot was so glamorous! The bridal gown and starry overskirt were custom-made for this shoot by Nidel Dresses in Louisiana. It is a modified trumpet gown with a strapless, sweetheart neckline, and corset back. The removable overskirt features a jeweled belt, and layers of starry fabric. Light and flowy, and simply gorgeous! The cathedral length ombre blue bridal veil was from Over the Moon Bridal in Washington state. The dark blue bridesmaid gown was provided by Doreen Leaf Designs in Hartville, Ohio. The designer is Madeline Gardner for Mori Lee. It is a floor length gown with allover lace and sequins. Very sparkly!

The gentlemen wore stylish suits of their own. The groom’s dark blue tie, pocket square, and pocket watch were all provided by Groomsday. The groomsman’s silver bow tie was provided by Doreen Leaf Designs.

Describe any handmade, DIY or personal items.

The jewelry provided by LivyLynn Vintage is handmade and very unique. Their collection is eclectic and matched our bride’s fun-loving personality.

The dark blue gauze table runner on the outdoor tablescape was custom made and hand-dyed especially for this shoot by Thistle and Twill. There are little white flecks in the material of the runner, that are reminiscent of stars twinkling in the night sky.

Describe the tablescape elements.

We had three tablescapes for this shoot:

The indoor tablescape was created on the 200-year old dining table and chairs, which are part of the Spring Hill Historic Home estate. We used the navy blue satin tablecloth and napkins, and the navy diamond overlay, from L’nique Linens. The silver luxe charger plates are also from L’nique Linens. The china, silverware, and crystal are all part of the Spring Hill estate. The floral centerpiece was created by Alyssa Schlegel, and we used the gold cake topper from Ever Laser to complete the look. The favors are blue and silver wrapped Hershey’s Kisses, placed in small tulle gift bags printed with silver stars.

The cake table was located in the formal parlor of Spring Hill. The table was covered in the navy blue satin tablecloth and the silver medallion sheer overlay from L’nique Linens. The gorgeous four-tier navy blue and silver cake was provided by Gearhart Custom Cakes. The silver mirrored acrylic cake topper was made by Traditions Engraving. We also placed blue and silver star-shaped votive candles around the table for extra sparkle.

The third tablescape was placed outdoors on the terraced lawn of the Spring Hill home. Dining al fresco under the stars was the order of the evening for our couples. The table was draped in navy blue satin, with a silver sequin table runner and navy blue napkins. The china, silverware and crystal are all part of the Spring Hill estate. The centerpiece is the same one that was used on the indoor tablescape. We changed out the cake topper to a different silver one created by Traditions Engraving, The heavy pewter candlesticks were added to provide illumination into the evening hours.

VENDORS

Photography:  Imagine It Photography  • Venue:  spring hill historic home •  Event Planning: Love, Laughter & Elegance: Wedding & Event Planning   •  Floral: Alyssa Schlegel •  Bridesmaid Dresses: Doreen Leaf Designs •  Videography: Joseph Testa Productions • Wedding Cake:  Gearhart Custom Cakes • Jewelry: LivyLynn   •  Linens: L’Nique Specialty Linen Rentals •  Hair: Angelyse Trammell •  Makeup: Summer Knight • Table Runner: Thistle and Twill •  Model: Lauren Simpson •  Model:Brandon Klaehn  •  Model: Sammy Kay Smith •  Model: JOE MORALES •  Wedding Dressnidel dresses • Table Numbers: Traditions Engraving   •  Tableware: spring hill historic home •  Pocket Squares/Ties/Watch: Groomsday  •  Cufflinks: Over the Moon Bridal •  Decor Items:Love, Laughter & Elegance: Wedding & Event Planning •  Cake Topper: Ever Laser •   Cake Topper: traditions engraving •  Paintings: amber elfrink •  Stationery: Santina Amendola Design •   Wedding Dressnidel dresses •  Bridesmaid Dresses: Mori Lee •   Veil: Over the Moon Bridal • Submitted via: Matchology

You may also enjoy the accompanying video from our styled shoot, by Joseph Testa Productions!  Starry Starry Night styled photo shoot

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Happy 4th of July! We have been featured on the Artfully Wed blog!!

Happy 4th of July, Everyone!  We have been blessed to have our 1940s War Bride and Groom styled photo shoot featured on the Artfully Wed blog today!!  Thank you so much to all of our vendors and models!  We couldn’t have done it without you!  Enjoy!

PATRIOTIC 1940S STYLED BRIDAL SHOOT

As a wonderful tribute to Love, Laughter & Elegance’s Grandparents and friends who have served in the military, this styled bridal photo shoot captured the classic feel of the many whirlwind marriages of WWII and took place in the historical MAPS Air Museum in North, Canton Ohio. With photography by Imagine It Photography, it is easy to be transported back to 1940 where romantic stories and crisp fashion were ever present.

From Love, Laughter & Elegance: “I have always been fascinated with the fashions and hairstyles of the 1940s, as well as the wartime romances and whirlwind marriages. My father’s parents served during that time. I knew that my grandmother was a WAAC. I have a black and white picture of my grandmother in her uniform, working at one of the local military service clubs. I wanted to capture the feelings of that era, and pay homage to all that served. I wanted to use multiple models, with one more casual wedding look, and one more glamorous. Since many young men of the day had only their uniforms to wear for weddings, I kept the same look for our male model throughout the photo shoot. Our decor choices were styled in classic red, white and blue. Those worked really well with our venue, a military museum filled with vintage airplanes, and other historic items.

I did a lot of research into the clothing of the era. I wanted two distinct looks for our female models, one more casual, and one more glamorous. Our first model wore a pretty blue day dress with red Mary Janes,red-trimmed gloves, a fetching red hat and matching jewelry. Her wedding ring set was my grandmother’s. Our second model, Lauren, we turned into an Old Hollywood siren. The dress had lavishly embellished cuffs and a dramatic open back that was edged in thick sparkling braid trim. There was a detachable train, and we added a cathedral length veil for more drama. Lauren’s jewelry was all sparkle.  Our male model wore a vintage Army Air Force uniform, which fit well with our venue. The Air Force did not become its own distinct military division until 1947.”

As for the extras, decor, flowers, and accessories needed to reflect a simpler time. All flowers used in the styled shoot were very reminiscent of those from the 1940’s – large, lush arrangements, that often were full of garden flowers like anemones, carnations, and lots of greenery. The baker created a simple 3 tier cake, covered in fondant, and adorned with small white flowers and patriotic ribbon with a cutout cake toper themed with a very popular song of the era. The tablescape was topped in classic red, white and blue and personalized with some very symbolic items of the time like Classic Coca-Colas with vintage striped paper straws, Cracker Jacks, simple class jars, coconut macaroons and WWII propaganda posters.

Photography:

We have been featured on the Southern Celebrations Magazine Blog!

We have been blessed to have been featured on the Southern Celebrations Magazine Blog!  This is in addition to having been featured in the latest edition of Southern Celebrations Magazine (vol. 6).  We are very grateful to have worked with the publisher, Virginia Conaway Buckner, to share our styled bridal photo shoot from July of 2016, with readers nationwide.  Thank you so much, Virginia!

We want to also thank our incredible team of vendors and models.  We could not have done all of this without your hard work, talent and vision!  Y’all Rock!!

 

We have been published in Southern Celebrations Magazine!!

It is with great excitement, that I am finally able to announce that the very first styled bridal photo shoot I produced in July of 2016, has been published nationally, in Southern Celebrations Magazine!! We are currently featured in volume 6, on pages 72 -75. 

Thank you to Virginia Conaway Buckner for sharing this project with your readers! It’s Gorgeous, Y’all!!!

I would like to thank my wonderful vendor team, who worked so hard to bring my vision to life! I love you all!

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We were mentioned on WeddingWire.com!

We have been blessed to have been mentioned in an article on WeddingWire.com!  Thank you, Jenn Sinrich, for your great work!

(https://www.weddingwire.com/wedding-ideas/wedding-etiquette-dos-most-people-forget)

9 Wedding Etiquette Must-Dos Most People Forget

Written by Jenn Sinrich  Photo: Anna Simonak Photography

The concept that there’s a right way to do something (and a wrong way), a.k.a. etiquette, has been around since the dawn of time. But, in today’s day and age, especially when it comes to weddings, much of the old-school protocol has gone out the window. Sure, it may have to do with changing times, or type of wedding you’re attending—i.e. a ceremony in a church with hundreds of people will likely hold you to a higher standard than a beach wedding with a handful of the bride and groom’s close friends—but that doesn’t mean etiquette in its entirety no longer exists (at least we hope not). “Etiquette was created so people would know how to act and be accepted by the rest of society, which, when you get right down to it, is no different than trying to get a ton of likes or hearts on your social media posts,” says Larissa Banting of Weddings Costa Rica in Santa Ana, Costa Rica.

So what rules should you remember at your own wedding—or as a guest? We talked to top wedding and event planners to get the inside scoop on which elements of wedding etiquette still matter today.

If you’re getting married…

Treat your guests like guests.

“Since you’re inviting people to celebrate your passage into wedded bliss, it’s your responsibility to make sure they are taken care of and made comfortable,” says Banting. “That means having enough seating for the ceremony so people aren’t left standing, having fans or cold drinks available if it’s hot, and having sufficient food and drink for all.” Of course, this is why you hire a wedding planner—to make sure you can sit back enjoy on your big day while ensuring your guests are taken care of. “It may be your day but once you’ve included other people along for the ride, you need to worry about their comfort too,” Banting adds.

Don’t keep people waiting.

You’re going to be pulled in a million and one different directions on your big day, which is why it’s crucial that you create a realistic timeline that you can stick to — and one that won’t keep guests waiting. “Hair and makeup is usually the area that can send the best-laid plans off the rails, so pad in an extra hour to ensure you’re ready on time,” suggests Banting. “If you have a long photo session between the ceremony and reception, offer guests a cocktail hour to keep them occupied—and, if you’re planning on having touchups done or changing into another outfit before or during the reception, just be aware of the time.”

Play music that will appeal to all guests.

You and your crew might be into Beyonce’s latest single, or those 90s throwbacks that you mentioned to your band or DJ in your pre-wedding meeting, but remember that you’ve likely invited guests of all ages. Consider what some of the older crowd (your grandparents, uncles, aunts) might want to listen to as well. “Select a wide range of music to be played so everyone has a chance to get up on the dance floor and have some fun,” says Banting. “Save the hip hop for later in the night once the older crowd has cleared out.”

Be thankful for your toasts.

As the focus of all the wedding toasts, the couple shouldn’t toast to themselves, says Banting. “Proper etiquette is to remain seated, smile and not raise your glass, then thank the person who made the toast.” Although it’s not required, she points out that it’s a nice gesture to finish the toast session with a small speech from you and your bride or groom. “Make sure to thank your guests for coming, your parents for their support and then say something gracious about your newly betrothed before raising a glass to all and taking a sip.”

Send thank-you notes.

Even if you had the chance to thank someone verbally for attending your wedding or giving you a gift, handwritten thank-you cards are still definite dos. “Guests spend considerable amounts of time and money in choosing a gift, selecting attire to wear, finding child care, and traveling to and from all of the wedding-related events,” Kimberly Lehman of Love, Laughter & Elegance in Massillon, Ohio, points out. “A heartfelt message, written to the giver of the gift, is much appreciated—just a few lines stating how nice it was to see them and spend time together at the shower or wedding, and how much the gift is appreciated and may be used is fine.”

If it’s not your wedding…

Give a gift at each event you’re invited to.

Traditionally, as a guest, if you are invited to the shower and the wedding, then yes, you should bring a gift, says Lehman, though the bachelorette party is usually more informal so a gift is not necessarily required. “If you are a member of the wedding party, you are expected to contribute financially to the shower and bachelorette party, as well paying for your attire, accessories and/or grooming for the wedding,” she adds. Of course, this can be a bit overwhelming for some, especially when you’re still in school, but Lehman points out that it’s your choice to say yes or no to being a part of the wedding party. “Another solution is to have the wedding party contribute one large gift, for example the stand mixer the bride has had her eye on for months.”

Don’t assume you can bring a plus-one.

“Many guests don’t realize that when they are invited to a wedding, the couple and families are paying for each individual person to attend, to eat and drink and be entertained, rather than one blanket fee,” explains Lehman. “This is why accurate head counts are so crucial to keeping the budget under control.” In other words, if the invitation sent reads “Mr. Jim Smith and guest”, then yes, bring said person, but if the invitation is addressed only to “Mr. Jim Smith,” only Mr. Smith himself is invited to attend.

Always RSVP by the deadline.

There’s a good reason invitations, especially ones to weddings, have a deadline for when you can RSVP by. Head counts are important people! Whomever is planning (and paying for) the wedding seriously needs to know how many people to expect far before the one-month countdown. “If you happen to see the bride before the wedding and end up telling her your RSVP in person, don’t think that got you out of sending your response in,” says Jessica Janik of The Invisible Bridesmaid in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. “As soon as you know you will or will not be able to make it, be courteous and send back the RSVP card if that’s what is requested.”

Don’t get in the way of the photographer or videographer.

You might consider yourself the master photographer, thanks to your skills on Instagram, but the couple hired professionals for a reason. “Don’t stand in front of the hired personnel so you can get the perfect shot of the bride and groom on their big day,” warns Janik. “And, if you did happen to take that perfect shot, wait until the ceremony starts to post a photo—you don’t want to beat the bride and groom and post before they have a chance to.”

We were mentioned on Martha Stewart Weddings!

We are thrilled to have been mentioned in an article on Martha Stewart Weddings! Thank you, Jenn Sinrich!

http://www.marthastewartweddings.com/614140/who-makes-decisions-when-parents-pay-for-the-wedding

(reposted from www.marthastewartweddings.com)

MAY 12, 2017

Who Gets the Final Say in Wedding Planning When Your Parents Are Paying?

Whose wedding is it anyway?

Contributing Writer
196SHARES
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Photography by: Rachel Thurston

Ahh, wedding planning. It’s one of the most joyous and exciting times in your life, but it’s also stressful and exhausting. Planning your dream wedding almost always involves working together with your parents (and maybe even your fiancé’s parents) to get the job done. The only thing that can complicate things even more? Who’s paying. “When engaged couples have a certain vision for their wedding, but the parents are paying, there can be some tension involved,” says Kimberly Lehman, wedding and event planner at Love, Laughter & Elegance in Massillon, Ohio. So what exactly do your parents have the say over and what’s left in your control when they’re writing the checks? We asked three wedding planners to weigh in.

 

TIMES TO INVOLVE YOUR PARENTS IN WEDDING PLANNING

 

Parents do have a say when it comes to venue.

If they’re paying, this is likely the biggest expense they will have throughout the entire process. That being said, it’s important that the couple is happy with the choice in venue. “You may go back and forth about certain aspects of the venue, but ultimately you should come to a compromise,” says Myriam Michel, owner of Boston-based M&M Elite Events. “For example, if the bride and groom are leaning more towards one venue, maybe give the parents more leeway to choose the food you serve.”

 

Parents don’t have a say in ceremony or vows.

It doesn’t get more personal or intimate than the ceremony and vows. “The support of a couple’s family is of the utmost importance, however, at the end of the day, the couple should decide what they say (and don’t say) in their vows,” says Lauren Chitwood, wedding and corporate event planner and owner of Lauren Chitwood Events in Louisville, Kentucky.

 

Parents do have a say in the wording of the invitation.

When Mom and Dad are paying, they’re technically the hosts, which means they should be comfortable with the invitation that’s being sent out. “It’s important to work closely with parents on the invitation, as it sets the tone for your wedding and is sent to the entire guest list,” says Chitwood. “I strongly advise my clients to work with a credible stationer to navigate politics of how to word an invitation, especially when divorced families are involved.”

 

Parents don’t have a say in the attire of the bridal party.

The bride’s wedding dress and the bridesmaids’ dresses are personal decisions. While they often end up being a collective decision because the bride wants input from her friends and family, she’s the only one who should have final say here. “The bride should be able to choose the dress she wants and how she wants her bridesmaids to look on her wedding day,” explains Chitwood. “That being said, I’ve never to see a bride make this decision alone—ultimately, parents, family and friends help her decide on attire.”

 

Parents do have a say with the wedding guest list.

“I think it’s important that hosts have a strong say with the length and composition of the guest list, however, the couple has the right to determine the size and scope of their wedding,” explains Chitwood. In other words, if the couple wants a small, intimate wedding, the hosts should grant that wish. “Inviting business contacts and family friends can be very important to hosts but doing so should not dramatically go against a couple’s wishes on wedding size.”

Tabitha and Jason -A Love Story

One of our favorite, and most memorable couples that we have worked with over the course of our career is Tabitha and Jason.  They had a very strong love and a care for each other that transcends time and physical bonds.  We felt that their story deserved to be shared.  Women’s Health Magazine online featured their story this month.  Please keep the tissues handy.

 

http://www.womenshealthmag.com/sex-and-love/planning-wedding-partner-has-terminal-cancer

 

 

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