We have been mentioned on Martha Stewart Weddings!!

We have been blessed to have been mentioned in an article on Martha Stewart Weddings!!  Thank you, Jenn Sinrich!!

https://www.marthastewartweddings.com/2139134/tips-feeling-confident-wedding-day

Every bride should feel great on this special occasion.

By Jenn Sinrich

November 25, 2019

If there’s one day you want to feel, look, and act your very best and feel as confident as can be, it’s without a doubt your wedding day—a day that’s entirely centered around you and the love of your life. But accomplishing this feat is a lot harder than it sounds. After all, this is a day you’ve likely been dreaming about for years, if not as long as you can remember, and you want everything to go according to plan. To help make your wedding-day dreams come true, we asked planners to share their best tips for feeling confident in your role as the bride.

Related: Easy Ways to Get Your Energy Up Before Your Wedding

Hire a great vendor team.

To feel truly confident on your wedding day, you need to know that it’s going to go off without a hitch—and that it’s being handled by professionals you can trust to get their jobs done right. Amy Greenberg of Amy Greenberg Events recommends hiring vendors who you really feel understand you and your vision, can be a calming presence on the day, and who you feel comfortable being your advocate. “Trust and comfort are key with all of your vendors,” she says.

Establish healthy habits early on.

Feeling and looking your best on your big day means taking care of yourself in the months, weeks, and days leading up to your wedding. In addition to eating well, exercising, and drinking plenty of water, it’s vital that you get your rest, especially as the 10-day countdown approaches. Don’t forget to pamper yourself a bit, too! “Manicures, pedicures, facials, and massages are wonderfully relaxing treats,” says Kimberly Lehman, wedding and event planner at Love, Laughter & Elegance. “The overall goal is to give you a healthy, radiant glow on your wedding day, which will show from the inside out!”

Be organized.

If you have a wedding planner, you should be all set in this department, but if you’re handling all the details yourself, it’s vital that you keep track of your checklists and timelines. Additionally, about two months before your wedding, Greenberg recommends sitting down with a couple of your most organized and detail-oriented friends and going through all your vendor contracts and noting deadlines and requirements. Then, start inputting these dates in your calendar with a reminder alert a few days before and on the day of. “Make your day-of timeline with the help of your venue or catering team and emcee, review your venue layout, check-in with all of your vendors, and then make more lists (the list of people who will need a day of timeline, all the things you need to pack when you leave your house for the last time before the wedding, what things you still have left to buy, order, or make, like seating assignments, welcome sign, card box, etc.),” she says.

Love your gown—and feel comfortable in it.

Your wedding day is not the day to squeeze into a gown or outfit of any kind that you feel self-conscious in. When choosing your wedding dress, comfort should be one of the biggest considerations. “You should buy something that you feel amazing in today and not something you have aspirations of feeling good in once you’ve gotten in shape or lost weight closer to the wedding,” says Leah Weinberg, wedding planner, owner, and executive planner at Color Pop Events.

Related: Five Tips for Feeling Your Best on the Morning of Your Wedding

Schedule engagement photos.

Weinberg always recommend that her couples do an engagement session or a couple’s session with their photographer before the wedding. “It’s less about having the photos themselves and more about getting comfortable together in front of the camera, since most couples haven’t been professionally photographed together and might not know how they best interact in front of the camera,” she says. “Doing a session with your photographer before the wedding will get you more comfortable with your partner and also more comfortable with your photographer.”

Do a hair and makeup trial.

For optimal day-of confidence, you should know what you plan to look like—both in terms of hair and makeup. This is where hair and makeup trials come in handy. “You don’t want to spend the morning of your wedding trying multiple styles and re-doing various looks,” says Weinberg. “You want to go into that day knowing what you want and having tried out that look with your hair and makeup person or people well in advance.”

Surround yourself with positive people.

Whether it’s your bridal party, close cousin, or mom, keep people who relax and calm you close by on your wedding day. Greenberg also suggests finding buffers for the family members who are likely to bring you stress. “If there’s someone who you feel like you have to have present while you are getting ready but fear they will cause you anxiety, ask someone else also to act as a buffer,” she says. “All in all, just make sure that you are surrounded by the people who make you feel like the best version of you and you will feel confidence with ease on your special day.”

Remember to breathe—and smile!

Your wedding day is your day, and one you won’t get back—so make the most of it! “If something is really bothering you, talk it out with your partner, family member, friend, or professional counselor,” says Lehman. “Whatever you do, don’t let a small issue get bigger over time until it seems near impossible to overcome.”

We have been quoted on Martha Stewart Weddings!

We have been blessed to be quoted in an article on Martha Stewart Weddings!  Thank you, Jenn Sinrich!!

https://www.marthastewartweddings.com/2108542/should-you-buy-wedding-dress-before-engagement?fbclid=IwAR2Bgc_w4C5E3cnekWU9KIm2157e8pB7HNmw_0KZrKUz76LkVl4DMu-szx8

Should You Ever Consider Buying a Wedding Dress Before Getting Engaged?

There are a lot of sides to this argument.
By Jenn Sinrich

September 27, 2019

wedding dress rack shopping with grandmaPhoto:  Diane Hu

Whether you’ve stumbled across the wedding dress of your dreams at a can’t-pass-up price or know that your engagement is just weeks away, you might be eager to begin the search for (and lock down) the gown that you’ll wear on the most important day of your life. But should you ever go so far as to buy a wedding dress before you actually get engaged? Opinions on this tricky topic vary.

 
Diane Lloyde Roth, celebrity and wedding stylist and owner of L’Armoire, considers it not only bad luck to purchase the wedding dress before getting engaged, but also just bad form. In addition to being presumptuous, you also don’t know where you’re going to get married or what time of year, both of which will play a large part in picking a dress. “For example, if you are getting married in the summer, you don’t want to be wearing a heavy gown,” she says. “Also, the style will reflect the location, whether it be a beach wedding, a formal ceremony in a church, or perhaps a more casual wedding location.” Another important factor that she points out is that body size and shape as well as style changes over time, so if you’re not getting married in the next calendar year, you might find yourself with a dress that’s the right size and/or a style that’s no longer “in.”

Jodi R.R. Smith, owner of Mannersmith Etiquette Consulting, on the other hand, doesn’t think this idea of buying a wedding dress before you get engaged is as crazy as it sounds. “Weddings can be very pricy affairs, so if you’re able to find a dress you love even before the engagement is official (or even before you find your significant other!), go for it,” she says. “Think about it this way: Brides who wear their mother’s wedding dress technically have their dress before they have the ring, so why should this situation be any different?”

Danielle Rothweiler, owner of Rothweiler Event Design, feels that there are a few scenarios that make sense for someone to consider buying a wedding dress pre-engagement—one being if she and her other half are discussing a future engagement that happens to be quite informal, especially if the engagement period is going to be short. “Most wedding dress take nine months to one year to be ordered and then altered for the bride, so if you’re talking about getting married and setting up details including the date and have limited time, you should start shopping in advance,” she says.

Kimberly Lehman, wedding and event planner at Love, Laughter & Elegance, feels that the decision is really dependent on the bride herself and her unique situation. “A wedding dress is one of the most personal and expensive purchases that someone will ever make, so there are a lot of factors to take into consideration,” she says.
Bottom line: What’s right for you might not be right for your friend, sister or co-worker, so take the advice you’re given lightly and ultimately go with your gut. If it’s the dress of your dreams, why let it go to another bride?

 

We have been mentioned on WeddingWire!!

We have been blessed, again, to have been quoted in an article on WeddingWire!!  Thank you, Jenn Sinrich!!

https://www.weddingwire.com/wedding-ideas/stop-being-indecisive-wedding-planning

How to Stop Being Indecisive About Wedding Planning

By Jenn Sinrich – 
 Is indecisiveness causing you some wedding-planning drama? Here’s how to stop being indecisive and move forward in your planning journey.
couple shopping for wedding flowers
Elizabeth Fogarty

Although wedding planning is most definitely fun and exciting, it can also be quite overwhelming, especially considering the myriad of decisions, both big and small, you’ll have to make in a relatively short period of time. As a result, couples planning their big day might come across a few situations where they just can’t choose and will need to just stop being indecisive.

This can happen for many reasons. According to Leah Weinberg of Color Pop Events in Long Island City, New York, the most common reason for indecisiveness over planning your wedding is that the experience is entirely brand new. “All of the different options to choose from can sometimes lead to decision paralysis, not to mention the fact that the couple is likely spending more money than they even imagined on their big day,” she says. “While you can’t necessarily take all the time in the world to make decisions during the wedding planning process, you should make sure that the decisions you do make are informed and thought out.”

If this sounds like you and your soon-to-be-spouse at the moment, don’t fret! Consider putting these expert-approved solutions to help you stop being indecisive about wedding planning.

Make a list of non-negotiables.

Early on in the planning process, Deb Erb of Simply Events Inc. in Lititz, Pennsylvania, suggests that couples make a concrete list of what is most important to them. “If flowers and pictures are a big deal to you, know that you should spend more time selecting your photographer and florist than perhaps your DJ or band,” she says. “Thinking through the most important aspects of a wedding day early on will also make it easier to stay within a budget.”

Block out the chatter.

Everyone is going to have opinions on your big day, from your best friend to your boss. While it’s fine to lend an ear to their dos and don’ts, you have to be careful when soliciting too much of their advice in order to stop being indecisive. “The more people you involve, the more opinions you are going to get,” warns Danielle Rothweiler of Rothweiler Event Design in Verona, New Jersey. “Without a doubt, those opinions will eventually conflict and you’ll be confused with whom to believe and not wanting to offend anyone.” She suggests keeping your circle small and making a pact with your partner that you two have to agree before deciding on anything.

Trust your vendors.

“Professionals know how to guide couples because they have the experience needed to know what works and how to cater toward the couple’s likes and dislikes and things they have dreamed about,” says Deb. “Vendors who only want the best for their clients will steer them in the right direction and help them stay on budget.”

Set social media limits.

While Instagram and wedding websites are amazing resources to plan out your big day, Deb warns that they can also make a couple feel pressured to keep up with what other couples are doing. “When a bride feels like she needs to include every décor idea and Pinterest suggestion into her day, it becomes very hard to make simple decisions, let alone difficult ones,” she adds.

Create a timeline—and stick to it.

Just as you would for your job, it’s helpful to create a checklist for when you should ideally have a wedding to-do crossed off your list. “Any accountability coach will tell you that the only way to truly get something done is to see it, formalize it, plan it and then tackle it,” says Jenny Orsini of Jenny Orsini Events in Berkeley Heights, New Jersey.” “Can’t figure out if you want your color palette to be blush and white or lavender and cream? Give yourself a limited amount of time to ponder the options and assign a due date by which you must decide.”

Ask for help when you need it.

This can include your mom, aunt, sister, grandma, BFFs—essentially anyone who is close to you and whose opinion you value and trust, advises Kimberly Lehman of Love, Laughter & Elegance in Massillon, Ohio. “A few positive opinions will reinforce your decisions and help you stop being indecisive, which will help you to go on to the next step in the planning process,” she adds.

Keep things in perspective.

At the end of the day, wedding planning is a huge endeavor, so of course some of the decisions are going to be met with a little hesitation to say the least. However, while it’s one of the most amazing days of your life, you do need to keep things in perspective. “You’re marrying your best friend, while surrounded by dear friends and family,” says Jenny. “Your guests will only remember the amazing energy of the party and how you glowed when you walked down the aisle, not whether the roses were purple or pink.”

We have been mentioned in Martha Stewart Weddings!!

We have been blessed, again, to have been mentioned in an article on Martha Stewart Weddings!  Thank you, Jenn Sinrich!!

https://www.marthastewartweddings.com/650598/reasons-to-not-stress-about-wedding-weather?fbclid=IwAR3pVPiN1eV0dNospDx-BFuMYL9jjlf8r924ZeDGdJlO-If1XKYxfRZPmRk

4 Reasons Why It’s Not Worth Stressing About the Weather Ahead of Your Wedding

Let those worries go.

Contributing Writer
taylor-john-wedding-rain-bridesmaids-umbrella-19-s113035-0616.jpg

Photography by: Landon Jacob Photography

When it comes to the most special and important day of your life, it’s hard to not get at least a little worked up over the little details. However, it’s important to realize which factors are in—and out of—your control. One that you can’t predict or change, no matter how hard you try, is the weather. “While it can be a hassle if you are caught in a sudden downpour on the way to your ceremony, or if a freak snowstorm blows in the weekend of your wedding, it doesn’t have to ruin your wedding,” says Kimberly Lehman, wedding and event planner at Love, Laughter & Elegance.

 

She does recommend, however, that all couples have a backup plan in place for your wedding, especially if any part of your celebration will take place outdoors. To help you cope with the unpredictability that comes along with wedding weather, here are some key reasons why it’s not worth stressing over.

 

RELATED: WHAT HAPPENS IF YOU HAVE TO RESCHEDULE OR CANCEL YOUR WEDDING DUE TO THE WEATHER?

 

You can’t control it.

To really enjoy the wedding day to the fullest, Leah Weinberg, wedding planner, owner, and executive planner at Color Pop Events, urges brides and grooms to accept that certain things will happen that day that are outside of their control. “When those things happen, you’ve just gotta roll with it,” she says. “Embrace whatever happens and make the best of it—that advice goes for things other than weather, too.”

 

Stress might kill the mood.

Not only is stress bad for your own health, but it can impact the moods of those around you. “If you find yourself snapping at others due to the weather, it could potentially cause more permanent damage,” says Sabrina Zeile of Weddings By Sabrina. “Even though it’s your special day, it’s important to be considerate of others.” If the weather is poor, she suggests shifting your focus to another aspect of the wedding like dancing.

 

Inclement weather might enhance your photos.

Believe it or not, but rain can make for incredibly romantic photos with ideal lighting, so embrace it! “I’ve seen some stellar photos taken on rainy days, so if you’re bummed about the rain, just flip your mindset and think of all of the cool images that are going to come out of it,” says Weinberg.

 

Your wedding day will fly by.

What’s the use in spending the majority of it worried and stressed? It’s important to remember that this day will happen rain or shine, and it will fly by. Instead of spending this precious time stressed out, which can cause negative effects such as headaches, fatigue, upset stomach, and muscle pain, Zeile suggests relaxing and re-focusing so you can enjoy the moments you do have while they’re happening.

We have been featured on Martha Stewart Weddings!

We have been blessed, again, to have been quoted in an article on Martha Stewart Weddings!!  Thank you, Jenn Sinrich!!

https://www.marthastewartweddings.com/647492/tracking-down-wedding-rsvps-before-due-date-etiquette

Can You Start Tracking Down RSVPs Before the Due Date?

We know you might be impatient.

Contributing Writer

 

  • fall wedding guests attire long sleeve patterned dress shirt
Photography by: Tec Petaja

If you’ve been an invited wedding guest before, you know the drill: You receive the invitation and your response card, along with a due date indicating when you must let the bride and groom know whether or not you’ll be in attendance. Sounds simple enough, right? But when you’re on the other end of things—the bride and groom awaiting dozens of RSVPs—you realize things become a bit more complicated. You’re at the mercy of your invited guests, and when people don’t respond by the designated date, you’re essentially required to track them down.

Should a couple anticipate the inevitable—that their guests won’t respond in time—and reach out to them before the due date to get an answer? The answer, according to wedding experts, is a resounding “no.” In fact, the pros agree that trying to track down invited ahead of the “RSVP by” date you’ve outlined on your invitations is seen as a rude. “With invites, it’s important to stay organized and calm throughout the entire process,” says Sabrina Zeile of Weddings By Sabrina. “I think couples are often eager to cut their guest count due to costs per person, but the response due date should be at least three weeks before your wedding, which gives guests enough time to decide if they can attend.” By reaching out for an answer before then, your guests may not have a chance to make travel arrangements, request time off work, or determine if it’s in their budget to attend.

If you fear that stress over the bottom line is what would force you to track down RSVPs early, the best thing you can do is only invite the number of guests you can afford to host. Kimberly Lehman of Love, Laughter & Elegance says that most brides and grooms anticipate a certain number of invited guests will decline the invitation, but that’s risky business—if they don’t, you’re on the hook financially for the group. She recommends creating an “A list” and “B list.” “For every person on the ‘A’ list of invitees who declines, an invitation could be sent to a guest on the ‘B’ list,” she explains. In order to do this successfully, you’ll need to set an early RSVP date and have two sets of invitations (one with an early RSVP date and another with a later one) printed.

If you’ve already sent your invitations and realize that the RSVP deadline you listed is too late, you have a few options, explains Lindsey Nickel, wedding planner and owner of Lovely Day Events. “The couple could send a quick and polite text to each guests, if there are not a ton or she could send a paperless post invite to the guests and request them to RSVP sooner via that link.” No matter what you’d do, you should apologize for asking for their response early, explain why you’ve reached out ahead of the RSVP date, and express understanding if they need more time to finalize their plans.

As in all situations, the couple should handle themselves with as much grace, tact, and patience as possible adds Lehman. “The last thing a couple wants to do is to become stressed out over the guest count.” Keep calm and remember that once the due date has passed, you have full permission to start tracking those RSVPs!

We have been mentioned on Martha Stewart Weddings!!

We have been blessed, again, to have been mentioned in an article on Martha Stewart Weddings!  Thank you, Jenn Sinrich!!

https://www.marthastewartweddings.com/641129/pros-and-cons-proposing-at-home

The Pros and Cons of Proposing at Home

Consider these factors before you decide to pop the question in the comfort of your own home.

Contributing Writer
proposals-almost-gone-wrong-katie-john-ring-0815.jpg

Brainstorming different ways to propose is exciting, but it’s also fraught with pressure. You’re approaching a major milestone as a couple, and the moment you ask her to marry you will be one you both remember forever. One of the first decisions to make when it comes to the proposal is location. Where will you pop the question? While many choose to get down on one knee in an exciting, often public, setting, others prefer the comfort of their own home. Neither is a wrong choice, but determining which is right for you depends on a variety of different factors.

 

According to Kimberly Lehman, wedding and event planner at Love, Laughter & Elegance, proposals at home are a long-standing tradition. “Not everyone has the time, money, or desire to plan an expensive or elaborate proposal,” she says. “In truth, the only requirements for a successful proposal are two people who love each other and want to spend their lives together, the question of ‘Will you marry me?’ and an affirmative answer.” Even an engagement ring is not always a must-have, she adds.

 

If you’re thinking about proposing at home, consider these pros and cons.

 

RELATED: WAYS TO MAKE YOUR PROPOSAL POP

 

Pro: There’s way less pressure.

Home is often the most relaxed and comfortable setting for any occasion, but especially something as monumental as a proposal. The lessened pressure to perform in front of a crowd allows the couple the opportunity to solely focus on what’s happening between them. In addition to a more relaxing setting, couples proposing at home score the benefit of having more control over their setting, whereas in a public forum, anything can happen to get in the way of their moment.

 

Con: It can be underwhelming.

If you’ve been dreaming of the moment you would someday be proposed to since you were a child, and always pictured it happening in a romantic place with lots of people around to ooh and aww it, you might be sorely disappointed when your partner winds up asking for your hand at the dinner table you sit at each and every night.

 

Pro: Your furry friend can play a role.

It’s tough to include Fido or Fluffy in a public proposal, especially since he might cause a distraction in the midst of such a crowd, but in the comfort of your own home, he can be the star of the show! There are countless ways to involve pets in proposals, and doing so might make the moment all the more sweet and memorable. “My favorite proposal has always been putting the ring on a collar,’ move,” says Catherine Kowalski, founder and designer of Catherine Kowalski Bridal. “While this can get dangerous if you’re cat or dog isn’t trained properly, when done in the security of your home, your chances of a disaster greatly decrease.”

 

Con: You might not have a photographer on hand.

Unless you hired a photographer, or asked a family member, to hide out in your home until you popped the question, you’ll likely have a hard time scoring a photo of your proposal. If you propose in a public setting however, you’ll have a plethora of people to ask to take your picture, or capture a video of you in the act.

 

Pro: It’s affordable.

If you’re looking to start saving for your future wedding, the idea of proposing in a place that will cost you an arm and leg isn’t so appealing. But, as Lehman points out, a proposal does not have to be an expensive undertaking. “Other than purchasing an engagement ring, you only need the love in your heart,” she says. “The emphasis should be on the words you say and the memories created in that moment.”

 

Con: It’s not the Eiffel Tower or the Grand Canyon.

If you and your future husband or wife like to travel or visit grand locations like museums, concert halls or monuments, then an at-home proposal may seem a little lackluster, Lehman explains. However, as an alternative, she suggests making a scrapbook of all the places you’ve visited together, including photos and mementos. “You can title it ‘Our Journey Together,'” she adds.

We were quoted in an article on WeddingWire!!

Sometimes I like to share personal experiences of when I was a young bride myself, and not just nuggets of wedding planning knowledge gained over the last 20 years or so.  Jenn Sinrich recently asked for brides to weigh in on whether they would or would not wear a veil on their wedding day.  I was happy to share my thoughts.  Thank you, Jenn!!

https://www.weddingwire.com/wedding-ideas/veil-or-no-veil

BRIDE & BRIDESMAIDS

Veil or No Veil? Real Brides Weigh In

Jenn Sinrich
By Jenn Sinrich
 Once you’ve said yes to the dress, there’s another important question to answer: Veil or no veil? Here’s how real brides made the call.
couple kissing bride with veil
HD Studio

“Veil or no veil?” is a question most modern-day brides might be asked. However, decades ago, it was a no brainer that a bride would wear a veil. It has long been a tradition embedded in a myriad of different cultures and societies all around the world. While veils are an undeniably beautiful aspect of wedding day attire, their purpose was for far more than appearance. In fact, a veil symbolized virginity. The act of “unveiling” the bride, or having the father lift the veil and present his daughter to the groom, was symbolically meant to represent the allowance of her to essentially no longer be a virgin. Kind of crazy when you think of it in modern terms, right?

Clearly, nowadays veils have lost most of that symbolism, of course depending on the culture. And, in modern American society, they’re not even an essential, or required, part of the ceremony or wedding day. In fact, many brides choose to forgo wearing a veil altogether. While some choose not to wear a veil because, well, they’re often quite expensive, ranging in price from $200 to $1,000+, others choose to keep their bridal look less traditional. For some women, walking down the aisle with their face covered feels belittling, while for others it’s an important and romantic tradition to uphold.

If you’re still trying to come up with your own answer to the “veil or no veil” question, these opinions of brides who’ve come before you might help you arrive at a decision.

“I never even considered not wearing one”

“I’m very much a traditionalist when it comes to weddings. I love the romance and softness of veils and I wanted to feel like a princess on my wedding day. I wore my veil for my entire wedding ceremony and reception and hated having to take it off at the end of the night along with my wedding gown. I recently pulled my veil out of storage and was showing it to my seven-year-old daughter, when she looked up at me and said, ‘Mom, can I wear that for my wedding?’ My heart just melted. I told her of course she could wear it. Of course, she may change her mind as she gets older, but I will hold onto that dream for her.”—Kimberly L.

“I was back and forth about veil or no veil”

“I tried on so many different types of veils—long, short, small, feathered, you name it. I ended up deciding on a two-tier ivory veil with gems up the sides and it was perfect! I was told by a few people that it tied my whole wedding look together. Looking back, especially at the pictures, I’m so happy that I decided to wear one—it’s the only time in my life that I will be able to!”—Sally L.

“I am NOT a veil girl”

“I sort of suspected that would be the case before I started shopping for a wedding dress, and I only had to try one on for a few seconds before confirming the fact. I know that in Say Yes to the Dress (which I love) the veil is always the piece that makes it feel ‘real’ to the clients—the missing piece that ‘makes them feel like a bride,’ but it felt costume-y to me (which is funny considering we had a Moulin Rouge-themed wedding that was full of costumes). I did, however, recognize that I needed something on my head to make the outfit complete, so I had a friend who’s a professional hat maker create a tea hat for me using the lace from my grandmother’s wedding dress as the foundation and border. Not only is it stunning, but it helped me feel close to her on a day I really wish she could’ve been there for. Plus I’ve worn it like six times now, which is a lot more use than I would get out of a veil.”—Molly C.

“I was team ‘no veil’ until a month before my wedding”

“I consider my style pretty modern and was never into the whole puffy dress and ‘princess’ bride look, so wearing a veil seemed a little over the top. Another factor that turned me off from veils was the price! Like many other brides, I was on a budget, so it was hard to imagine spending over $100 on a piece of tulle that I’d wear for five hours tops. Closing in on less than 30 days before the big day, I had been browsing Etsy every day and found a simple, delicate and pretty veil for around $60. I decided to go for it and figured, if I didn’t like it, I wouldn’t feel bad about spending that amount. Well, that last-minute decision was one of the best decisions I made during my wedding planning. As soon as I took the veil out of its box, I got butterflies and instantly fell in love.”—Jannelle G.

“I felt pressured into wearing a veil”

“I never wanted to wear a veil, especially because I was having a more casual beach wedding, but felt pressured into it by family members. Eventually, I gave in and bought one. It ended up being so windy that day there was no way the veil was going to work, so I didn’t even put it on. Ultimately, it was a waste of money and I really wish I had stuck to my gut feeling. I think it depends on the bride’s personality and the formality of the event. If you’re Meghan Markle, for example, you probably didn’t have a choice in the matter!”—Kristin C.

“I wore two veils during my wedding!”

“Deciding ‘veil or no veil’ at my wedding wasn’t even a question for me. I knew exactly what I wanted to do even before I found my dress. For me, it was all about the photos during the ceremony and getting those forever memories. I wanted that ethereal look in the church with the light pouring through the windows, and a veil can help capture that light and create that feeling around a bride. I’m also no-fuss when it comes to my personal style. A wedding dress can be a lot to handle on it’s own, and a piece of tulle getting caught in the breeze or in the door or in a cactus (as was my experience) isn’t exactly ‘no fuss,’ so, I opted for both options. I wore a cathedral length veil during my ceremony and photos then switched it up with a floral accent piece in my hair for my reception. Best of both worlds!”—Jessica F.

“My veil caused so much chaos”

“I was ambivalent about the veil or no veil question, but my mom really wanted me to wear one, so I got one to make her happy. Truth be told, I was happy with how it looked, but I didn’t really think it through when it came to our venue. There was a spiral, carpeted staircase I was to descend. As I started going down, I felt the veil’s comb start to pull at the back of my head because my veil had stubbornly attached itself to the carpet at the top of the staircase. I was alone at the top of those steps and had to turn halfway around to tug at the veil to prevent it from yanking my hair back even further or popping right off, which would have been quite the surprise to the 150 people watching. Minor veil disaster averted until we said our vows and began to make our way through the crowd, at which point my husband stepped right through my veil.” —Amy B.

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